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Draft  | Prospect Scouting Reports  | 3/24/2017

2017 MLB Draft Pack: March 24

David Rawnsley      Jheremy Brown     
Photo: Perfect Game

Once a week leading up to the 2017 MLB Draft Perfect Game will provide detailed scouting reports, and video (when available), on 10 of the top draft-eligible prospects. The first report each week will be available for free, the rest can be viewed with a PG Insider subscription. To learn more about Perfect Game’s subscription packages and to sign up today please visit this link.

Previous MLB Draft Packs:

March 17: Nick Allen, Cole Brannen, Michael Gigliotti, Hunter Greene, D.L. Hall, Keston Hiura, Blaine Knight, Corbin Martin, Brendan McKay, Joe Perez.


Prospects covered this week: Jake Eder, MacKenzie Gore, Colton Hock, Zach Kirtley, Alex Lange, Royce Lewis, Calvin Mitchell, Glenn Otto, Evan Skoug, Cole Turney.




Jake Eder – LHP

Height/Weight: 6-4/210
Bats/Throws: L/L
Birthdate: Oct. 9, 1998
High School: Calvary Christian
Hometown: Ocean Ridge, Fla.
Travel Team: FTB Tucci
Commitment: Vanderbilt
Projected Draft Round: 1S-2

Jake Eder has undoubtedly been frustrating plenty of both area and national scouts over the past year. All the ingredients are there physically for the 28th-ranked player in the Perfect Game national rankings. He has a long limbed and still projectable 6-foot-4, 210-pound build. His arm action is very loose and free and smooth coming through. He has individual innings and even outings where he's been bumping the mid-90s with life on his fastball and working to spots. His changeup is a much improved pitch and he will show just enough flashes of a solid curveball to cause optimism for the future.

But it hasn't been consistent at all. For every outing like the one Eder had at the WWBA World Championship last August, where he was touching 94 mph and his curveball was a sharp downward breaker, there is an outing where the curveball is loopy and soft. For every outing where Eder is working both corners with his fastball and is ahead in counts, there are others where the strike zone is a moving target. At the Area Code Games last summer Eder pitched twice and managed to put together one of each outing.

As with most pitchers, that inconsistency pretty much comes down to mechanics and the ability to repeat a release point. Eder's arm action is long in back and his stride out front with his long legs is long as well. Eder also tends to lean his upper body back at the top of his delivery, tilting his lead shoulder upward. Getting everything timed up and in sync from the moment Eder's body and arm start moving forward to when he releases the ball has been an issue. Usually it's been a matter of Eder's arm being late coming through. His fastball tends to miss up arm side when he's out of sync, while getting out front early causes him to "cast" his curveball, in scout terminology, instead of getting out front and over the pitch at release.

Eder was a relative latecomer to the top prospect community and obviously has lots of time to make adjustments and grow into his mechanics. If a team does pop him high enough in June, it will be a team that buys into the patience factor and the very high physical ceiling. If that doesn't happen, it's easy to see Eder, who is a solid student with a Vanderbilt ride, becoming an elite level draft pick in 2020. (DR)


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